Campanology: ‘Once you learn you will get hooked.’

The final of the National Twelve Bell Striking Contest will be held at St Peter Mancroft Church tomorrow, when 10 of the best teams of ringers from across the country, plus several hundred visiting ringers will visit the city.

The Norfolk Record Office holds the records for no fewer than four ringers’ societies, all based at St Peter’s, the earliest of which was the Norwich Ringers’ Purse founded in 1716.  Members paid weekly contributions and, in return, received financial support when they fell sick.  The purse also supported families of deceased ringers.

The most recent ringers’ society is the Guild of Ringers, which was founded in 1907, after a bitter dispute between the vicar and churchwardens on the one hand and the ringers on the other.  At one point, the belfry was closed, the vicar got rid of all the old ringers and a new band was formed.

Even then, prospective new ringers had to demonstrate that they could ring three distinct methods on twelve bells before they were admitted.  Ringing a method means pulling your rope so that your bell follows all the other bells in the tower in turn, with a constantly changing pattern and at different speeds, all done by memory.

The most common method is Plain Bob Doubles, rung on five bells, usually with a sixth bell, called the tenor behind, always in the final place to keep a good sense of rhythm.  Ringing the same method on eleven bells would be called Plain Bob Cinques. On twelve bells, it would be Plain Bob Maximus.

Postcards of St Peter Mancroft Sanctus Bell, c 1920, and Tenor Bell, c 1924

Postcards of St Peter Mancroft Sanctus Bell, c 1920, and Tenor Bell, c 1924

Ringing on 11 or 12 bells is very difficult, demanding years of practice and intense concentration so that the bells all sound absolutely in time.  If anyone makes a mistake, the bells will clash and the resulting cacophony would be heard all over Norwich. It is said that the best ringers can ring to a precision of 3/100ths of a second.

Over the years, St Peter’s has acquired a total of 14 bells (though it is normally regarded as a ring of 12) plus a sanctus bell, which is rung during the communion service.  The largest number of bells in one tower in England is 16, at Birmingham St Martin.

The first true peal, lasting three hours and eighteen minutes on Plain Bob Triples (seven bells), was rung at St Peter’s on 2 May 1715.  A peal is often rung to celebrate a special occasion, such as a birthday.

The Norfolk Record Office also holds a short article on campanology from the Mancroft Review of 1971.  This is mainly an appeal for more ringers to join the regular band, but it also describes the learning process:

‘Beginners are not taught at Mancroft, but on the six [bells] at St George, Colegate. There the bells are not so heavy and the ropes are just 40 feet long, compared to Mancroft’s 70 feet.  But beware … campanology is a disease!  Once you learn, you will get hooked.’

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2 Responses to Campanology: ‘Once you learn you will get hooked.’

  1. Alan Metters says:

    This brings back many memories – I used to be a bell-ringer many years ago, while living in the north of England. It somehow fell out of my life when I moved south – I don’t really remember how or why.
    You might also mention that a ‘true peal’ consists of the continuous, uninterrupted, ringing of at least 5,000 changes, except for 7-bell methods when the full maximum extent of 5,040 changes must be rung.
    Happy days! Campanologists are invariably a very social and sociable bunch.

    Like

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