Legal Battles, Prison Sentences and Requests for Prayers: The Stories of the Owners and Occupiers of Snettisham Farm

King’s Lynn Borough Archive has a huge collection of ancient documents on all manner of subjects, among which is a large series relating to Snettisham Farm. The Farm has a very chequered and interesting history, with one occupier ending up in Fleet prison following a long legal battle and a long term owner being accused unfairly deposing of the land.

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Anchored in Beer and Land – Bullards Brewery Estate Plans

The estate plans for Bullards Brewery date from 1895, beginning shortly before it registered as a limited company when it was recorded that it owned 280 houses and leased 161.  Eight volumes of plans detail their estates across Norfolk and Suffolk (and one in Essex), the vast majority drawn by surveyor Walter Frederick Browne.

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Concentration Camps- for Horses!

It is very interesting being an Archive Blogger and having access to so many maps and documents that provide windows to the past. There is, however, one problem that continually arises when you are researching a specific topic, the distraction of finding other interesting stories. One minute you are on focus and the next, you are off on a tangent; in this case, wondering why during the First World War, there were concentration camps for horses!

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A Murderer in the School: The case of Eugene Aram of King’s Lynn.

When I was a kid in Bradford, one of my favourite weekend outings was to York. Among its attractions was the Castle Museum and the condemned cell, where I first came across the story of Eugene Aram. At that time, it had no significance beyond being a gruesome tale; my only connection with East Anglia was that Bradford City signed a goalkeeper, Johnny Downey, from Wisbech Town, and I had no idea where Wisbech was anyway.

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Call the Midwife in Loddon

At the turn of the 20th century, with no NHS, many towns and villages had their own Nursing Association. Loddon formed its own Nursing Association as part of the Norfolk Federation from 1907. A newspaper report of March that year minutes a meeting at the Town Hall where it was felt that they should affiliate to the Norfolk District Cottage Nursing Association.

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Robert Henry Bollin: One Man’s Impact on Life in 19th Century King’s Lynn

Written by Christine Shackell

In July 2018, Stories of Lynn museum hosted an exhibition on the life of Robert Henry Bollin, 1812-1885. His story had been unearthed during family history research and showed how, by searching beyond dates of birth, marriage and death, a more interesting picture of the man could emerge. Robert was not a native of King’s Lynn but came to the town in 1847 as a result of the building of the railway and made his mark during his ten year stay.

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The Will of the Distinguished Lawyer Reginald de Eccles

Norfolk Record Office holds the will of Reginald de Eccles [1] written in August 1380, an extensive document in Latin comprising two parts and entirely consistent with his position as a wealthy 14th century lawyer. Reflecting the beliefs of the testator in the pre-Reformation church, the first part of the document, the testament, deals exclusively with Reginald’s desire to ensure his celestial future with a wide range of intercessory bequests. Having first committed his soul to Almighty God, Reginald then requests to be buried in the chancel of the parish church of All Saints, Billockby, leaving one marke [13s4d] to the high altar there, and a further marke for the reparations of the church.

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‘From witchcraft to understanding your own electricity account’: The activities of The Electrical Association for Women

We live in a gadget driven age, today’s new technology quickly replaced by the next latest advancement.  However, back in the 1920s, simply having electricity in the home was a marvel in itself.

The Electrical Association for Women (EAW) was a national organisation co-founded in 1924 by Caroline Haslett and Laura Wilson.  Sussex born Haslett was an electrical engineer and a champion of women’s rights. Through using electricity in the home, she wanted to liberate women from household drudgery so that they could pursue their own careers. Haslett became the first director of the EAW which had a clearly defined focus – to promote the safe use of electricity in the home.

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